Michigan Asparagus

 

Asparagus stands dot the roads from Detroit to Traverse City, MI.

Fresh asparagus and rhubarb--harbingers of warm days in Michigan--$2 a pound.

I spent the Memorial Day weekend with my sisters, which is a real treat since we’re flung all across the country. My sister from Detroit arrived toting a bag of asparagus. Yes, June is asparagus time in Michigan, where the stalks grows big and fat and green. Real local asparagus is hard to come by, at least in the warmer climes, such as Tennessee where most of it comes from California–so super fresh asparagus straight from the ground is a real treat. Michigan asparagus with its chunky, hearty stalks is perfect for grilling, or roasting. I typically toss the whole stalks with a little sesame oil, sea salt, pepper and a splash of soy sauce and roast at 400 for about 15 minutes or plop on the grill for about 10 minutes.

Top sauteed asparagus with warmed percatelli and sour cream. Ham would be a great addition.

Use a combination of cheese, swiss and sharp Dubliner.

This time though, I needed a quick dinner and about all I had in the fridge after my trip was the asparagus we came home with and some leftover pasta–which spelled frittata. I sautéed the asparagus in olive oil with some spring onions, topped with the leftover percatelli (I had heated in the microwave), dabbed with some fresh sour cream, and 6 beaten eggs, and sprinkled with grated Swiss and sharp Dubliner cheese.  Detroit tasted pretty good to us.

Asparagus Cheese Fritatta

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3 thoughts on “Michigan Asparagus

  1. Oh my goodness, that looks so wonderful. Asparagus is one of my favorites so it is great to see this simple, no frills recipe that is just another tasty treat from your kitchen. I enjoy the “just do it” approach you have with food. Keep up the tasty work. T

  2. Fresh, Michigan asparagus is so much sweeter than the variety you find at the store. This recipe looks so good. My kids are still a bit divided on asparagus but they’re growing to like it, especially when they see my husband and I argue about eating their leftover stalks–they figure they must be worth another try:)

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